All posts by Sheila

I have a passion for the outdoors and I am most happy enjoying what nature has to offer. Hobbies include photography, birding, Pickleball, astronomy, biking, and hiking. I have been happily married, for 44 years, to an amazing person.

~Dressed in Summer Colors

showing off my summer colors

I walk these fields

for all the travelers to see

wyoming is the place to be

Sandhill Crane

This is the first Sandhill Crane I have seen in their summer plumage.

 

Song Sparrow

Every morning we have been serenaded by a very experienced vocalist. 

 

An elusive Cedar Waxwing

 

It’s nice to see so many nesting Osprey.

 

Violet Green Sparrow

Swallows are everywhere, lots of bugs to catch. They are also hard to photograph.

 

What a strange place to see this bird. It sits on the fence next to our RV. I am not sure what it is, but I think it might be a Short-billed Dowitcher.

 

Until next time – Happy Birding!

 

~The Snake River

~Yesterday, we stopped at the Snake River pull-off while driving through The Tetons. The trees have grown over the years blocking a lot of the view, but one can still get a glimpse.

The Snake River in the Tetons.

It wasn’t until the year 1912 that the United States Geographic Board made official the name, “The Snake River.” The Snake River Got its Name From a Misinterpretation over 11,000 years ago, the Snake was a vital source of life for the Native Americans, specifically the Shoshones, that were living along the banks of the river.

The Snake River is a major river of the greater Pacific Northwest region in the United States. At 1,078 miles long, it is the largest tributary of the Columbia River, in turn, the largest North American river that empties into the Pacific Ocean. The Snake River rises in western Wyoming, then flows through the Snake River Plain of southern Idaho, the rugged Hells Canyon on the Oregon–Idaho border, and the rolling Palouse Hills of Washington, emptying into the Columbia River at the Tri-Cities, Washington.

I spotted three Bald Eagles circling the area. It looked like two adults and one immature. What a beautiful sight.

Bald Eagle

Cattle round0up along Hwy 191.

 

~A Famous Barn

~Off of Antelope Flats Road in The Tetons sits an old barn, and it is probably the most photographed barn in the US.   It was built by Thomas Alma Moulton and his sons between 1912 and 1945. 

It sits west of the road known as Mormon Row, in an area called Antelope Flats, between the towns of Kelly and Moose. Now lying within Grand Teton National Park, it is near the homestead of Andy Chambers. The property with the barn was one of the last parcels sold to the National Park Service by the Moulton family. Often photographed, the barn with the Teton Range in the background has become a symbol of Jackson Hole.

Would you liked to have lived here?