Tag Archives: Madera Canyon

~Arizona Birding Series – Canyon Towhee

November/December 2020

These Towhees are difficult to photograph, and it is funny that the best photo I got was when it landed on the curbing. Oh well, I’ll take it! [Grins].

 

Taken at Cave Creek Regional Park. Cave Creek, AZ
This one was taken at Madera Canyon.

Canyon Towhees keep a low profile across their range in the Desert Southwest. These big, warm-brown sparrows are common on the ground and underneath shrubs in a variety of scrubby habitats, but they easily blend into the background. Look for a fairly long-legged, long-tailed sparrow that’s the same color as the dirt, with warm rusty brown under the tail. They look very similar to the widespread California Towhee (the two were once considered the same species), but their ranges don’t overlap.

Cool Facts:

  • Canyon Towhees are desert creatures and they pay attention to water supplies. They can nest twice a year, timing their attempts to coincide with winter and summer rains, which produce a flush of plant material and insects.

  • Canyon Towhees’ seemingly simple songs contain lots of variation and have been well studied. In 1968, two scientists described this variation colorfully: “At its worst, the song is a dull series of chips, but at its best, it is a gay, sustained jingle to be compared with that of a titmouse. A male whose dawn singing has been dull and perfunctory during late winter and early spring will become transformed into a polished singer when his mate disappears to incubate….”

  • Present-day Canyon Towhee and California Towhee were once considered the same species, named the Brown Towhee. Mitochondrial DNA, which traces genetic history along the mother’s gene line, provided the evidence needed to split the two species.

  • The oldest recorded Canyon Towhee was a male, and at least 7 years, 2 months old when he was recaught and rereleased during banding operations in Texas in 1998. He had been banded in the same state in 1992.

~Arizona Birding Series-Mexican Jay

~Mexican Jay, Madera Canyon-December 2020

This Jay was a new bird for me. Number 398.

Note the pale-color at the base of the bill.

The Mexican jay formerly known as the gray-breasted jay is a New World jay native to the Sierra Madre Oriental, Sierra Madre Occidental, and Central Plateau of Mexico and parts of the southwestern United States.

In May 2011, the American Ornithologists’ Union voted to split the Mexican jay into two species, one retaining the common name Mexican jay and one called the Transvolcanic jay. The Mexican jay is a medium-sized jay with blue upperparts and pale gray underparts.

It resembles the Woodhouse’s scrub-jay but has an unstreaked throat and breast.

Western Scrub-Jay. Loveland, CO

The Mexican Jay feeds largely on acorns and pine nuts but includes many other plant and animal foods in its diet. It has a cooperative breeding system where the parents are assisted by other birds to raise their young. This is a common species with a wide range and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has rated its conservation status as being of “least concern”.

 

This photo was taken in Madera Canyon.

Looking toward the canyon.

Happy Birding wherever you are!

 

 

 

 

~Arizona Bird Series – Acorn Woodpecker

Madera Canyon, December 30, 2020

I first saw this bird on 11/07/2009 while visiting Fort Davis State Park.

“What no holes?”

Acorn Woodpeckers are very unusual woodpeckers that live in large groups, hoard acorns, and breed cooperatively. Group members gather acorns by the hundreds and wedge them into holes they’ve made in a tree trunk or telephone pole. Acorn Woodpeckers also spend considerable time catching insects on the wing.

 

Note the tail.

“Where is my next acorn?”

Happy Birding!

~Arizona Bird Series-Magnificent Hummingbird

Madera Canyon – December 27, 2020

The Magnificent Hummingbird is a new one for me. Number 397.

The Magnificent Hummingbird is a large hummingbird named in regards to its dazzling plumage.The Magnificent Hummingbird\\ is the second-largest member of the hummingbird family found north of Mexico (behind only the Blue-Throated hummingbird). The adult male Magnificent hummingbird has a bronze tail, green and bronze upperparts, and a gray belly.

~Happy Birding~