Category Archives: Photos-Landscapes

Last Images from Tuesday’s Trip to Rocky…..

I am so very lucky to live in such a beautiful area `the Colorado Rockies

A Beautiful old Tree Stump
A Beautiful old Tree Stump

once beautiful tree

had lived many seasons

beauty in its death

Canyon Walls in the Big Thompson Canyon
Canyon Walls in the Big Thompson Canyon
Big Thompson River
Big Thompson River
Steller's Jay (very agitated because of the Crow)
Steller’s Jay (very agitated because of the Crow)
American Crow - looking pretty ragged
American Crow – looking pretty ragged
Another Hiking Path (dark clouds are to the left of this image)
Another Hiking Path (dark clouds are to the left of this image)
Upper Beaver Meadows. Why would anyone start out with clouds looking like that? See his wife down the path?
Upper Beaver Meadows. Why would anyone start out with clouds looking like that? See his wife down the path?
Meadow in Summer Colors
Meadow in Summer Colors

A fun day spent with friends in Rocky Mountain National Park…..

Exploring Rocky Mountain National Park is always enjoyable; however when you are showing friends around that have never seen this beautiful national park before, it is even more fun.

 

Summer in beautiful Rocky Mountain National Park
Summer in beautiful Rocky Mountain National Park

Friends from Louisiana were visiting us and we drove up to Rocky to spend the day. I can remember seeing Rocky for the first time about 27 years ago when we moved from Louisiana to Colorado.

As most people do, I think our Louisiana friends fell in love with this Colorado national park, so much so, they just might be back for another visit. I hope so!

Seeing a place so gorgeous, for the first time, is a memory I think we all hold dear and one we usually never forget.

Tamias minimus - Chipmunk
Tamias minimus – Chipmunk

Day Trip to Rocky…..

Small but vigilant scout
Small but vigilant scout

     Early Monday morning a friend and I left Loveland and headed to Rocky Mountain National Park. It is a short drive of about twenty miles and I always take the scenic route through the town of Glen Haven. It is a gorgeous drive.

     Traveling though the Big Thompson Canyon is always a special event, with its tall, jagged, cliffs jetting into the sky above you and the flowing waters of the Big Thompson River running below you. 

     Most times, driving this canyon, one will get a glimpse of a few Rocky Mountain Big Horn Sheep grazing on the sides of these steep, stone walls, but on this trip we did not spot any.

     As you drive through the canyon there are many places to pull off the road and enjoy the scenery and the smoothing sounds of the rapidly flowing river, especially this time of year with the spring snow melt raging downstream.

      It is relaxing to stand by the river, close your eyes and listen to the sound of the water as it searches it way over, around and even under boulders that are in its path as it traverses down the canyon.

      Fly fishers (men and women) {Smile} come to the waters of the Big Thompson from all over the world to cast their lines hoping to snag a Rainbow Trout. It seems so memorizing observing a person out in the middle of a stream, dressed in waders and all their waterproof clothing, casting their long lines back and forth, back and forth. I will have to try to photograph a fly fisher person.

     As we left the canyon having traveled through the little mountain town of Glen Haven we  crested the last hill and descended into the valley toward Estes Park. The Rocky Mountains, with their snow covered peaks, are what you see first. As your eyes adjust to seeing these magnificent mountains you can then and only then take in the beauty of the valley as it stretches out in front of you.

¬† ¬† ¬†Mountain Blue Birds call this area home in the spring and summer and you will usually see them sitting on a fence post or flying up to catch a bug. I did not get to take a photo of one, but next time….

     This year we had two late-spring snow storms that took a told on the Mountain Blue Bird population as they were migrating through the area. People were reporting large numbers of dead birds in their yards. One lady had twelve. My husband and I found two in our yard.

     Leaving the valley, heading to the entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park, we had to make an immediate u-turn. We had spotted a huge, bull Elk along the side of the road and decided he would definitely be worth a photo or two. One can imagine, or maybe not, spending the winter at or near 12,000 feet. This poor guy was looking exactly like he had experienced a harsh winter Рa little ragged with tuffs of fur hanging in clumps off his body; however he still was wearing his beautiful felt-covered antlers. He was having a mid-morning snack at a backyard bird feeder. Good for him.

     We finally entered the park. As we drove and hiked around experiencing the serenity and wonder of this national park, as on this day and with every visit, it did not fail to bring joy to my soul and deep appreciation for the beauty of nature.

     The highlight for me, this visit, were the two dueling male Broad-tailed Hummingbirds defending their territory. Each surveying their world from the high perch of their own pine tree. High into the air they would fly, soaring downward and then back up just as you think they are going to crash into the ground. Who is the bravest?

     We drove the twenty miles back home with wonderful memories and meaningful impressions of a successful and fun day visiting Rocky Mountain National Park.