Tag Archives: Birding

~Friday’s Feathered Friend~ (Laughing Gull)

~Laughing Gull~ (adult) Black hood, black legs, white underparts, white crescent marks above and below eyes, reddish beak, broad white collar.

Added to my Birding Life List in April 10, 1993~

Laughing Gull
Laughing Gull
"Go Away"
“Go Away”
"I'am getting bored"
“I’am getting bored”

Laughing Gulls  were named, because they have a laughter like call! They are medium-sized gulls with fairly long wings and long legs that impart a graceful look when they are flying or walking. They have stout, fairly long bills. Adult Laughing Gulls are medium gray above and white below.

Summer adults have a crisp black hood, white arcs around the eye, and a reddish bill. In winter, the hood becomes a blurry gray mask on a white head.

The legs are reddish black to black. Immatures are much browner and more subtly patterned than adults; they take 2-3 years to gain adult plumage.

In the early 20th century, the Laughing Gull was threatened by the feather trade. Today they are common, stable over much of their range and numbers have been increasing in the northeastern US in recent years.

If you are interested in learning more about the Laughing Gull, please visit this web-site or any other birding web-site:

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/laughing_gull/id

Close Up
Close Up

I found the fact that they take 2-3 years to gain adult plumage very interesting. I took these photos on a beach near Destin, Florida about a week ago. Notice the white tail, therefore I think it is an adult in winter plumage. Some people don’t like gulls; however I enjoy watching and photographing them. I believe they serve a purpose along our shorelines.

This gull was standing about 10 feet from the edge of the Gulf, looking out over the waves, perhaps waiting for a  Pelican to drop a morsel of food at its feet.

~

Just as I am! Every Friday you may participate in Feathers on Friday at Prairie Birder.

Here is Charlotte’s Blog web-site:

http://prairiebirder.wordpress.com

This is another great Blog to learn about Birds!

~

Enjoy Birdwatching!

It can be entertaining as well as educational!

~

Some of my information for this post was taken from Field Guide to Birds of North America, Smithsonian Handbook, Birds of North America and Cornell Lad of Ornithology and their website All About Birds.

~Friday’s Feathered Friend~ (Brown Thrasher)

~Brown Thrasher~ reddish-brown above, streaked below, yellow eye and down-curved bill

Added to my Birding Life List in January of 1988~

Brown Thrasher
Brown Thrasher

~

"Can you see me, I am hiding?"
“I’am trying to hide”

~

This Brown Thrasher was a frequent visitor to a wooded area near our campsite. I was delighted to see this bird and amused watching it hunt for food. At times it looked like a jack-hammer, repeatedly stretching upward and then coming down pounding the ground with its large bill. At times you would see dead leaves and pine needles flying in all directions as it sweep the forrest floor with its curved bill.

~

Jack-hammer Thrash
Jack-hammer Thrash

~

A nice view showing its streaked body and white-wing bars
A nice view showing its streaked body and white-wing bars

If you are interested in learning more about the Brown Thrasher, please visit this web-site or any other birding web-site:

 http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Brown_Thrasher

It can be tricky to glimpse a Brown Thrasher in a tangled mass of shrubbery, and once you do you may wonder how such a boldly patterned, gangly bird could stay so hidden. Brown Thrashers wear a somewhat severe expression thanks to their heavy, slightly downcurved bill and staring yellow eyes, and they are the only thrasher species east of Texas. Brown Thrashers are exuberant singers, with one of the largest repertoires of any North American songbird. (description as taken from All About Birds)

~

Enjoy Birdwatching!

It can be entertaining as well as educational!

~

Just as I am! Every Friday you may participate in Feathers on Friday at Prairie Birder.

Here is Charlotte’s Blog web-site:

http://prairiebirder.wordpress.com

This is another great Blog to learn about Birds! 

~Run, Baby, Run~

A Fence Post Ornament
A Fence Post Ornament

~

a fence ornament

if only it would stay put

fast, long and slender

eagle eye spots a morsel

off and running she goes

~

"I think I will stretch, before I take off."
“I think I will stretch, before I take off.”
Why don't you stay awhile?
Why don’t you stay awhile?
Run, Baby, Run
Run, Baby, Run

I took these photos while at Copper Breaks State Park. We were driving out of the park and i noticed her sitting on this fence post. I got out of the car and was able to capture these shots before, as you can see, she darted off!

SkyeRiver Photography ©Sheila de Laneuville

 

Something in Common…..

Double-crested Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant

 This image was taken February, 2012 near Eastbank Campground, an Army Corps of Engineer park.

~

Neighborly encounter, on the trail

I observe binoculars around her neck

Ah, something in common

 

I am a birder you see

A wonderful hobby, a life long passion

We stop to chat

 

What birds have you seen today, I ask

New to this hobby, so I offer her an excursion

Other locations to search for birds

 

She exclaims

“Yes, maybe one day, perhaps in the fall

We’ll also do some hiking”

 

Now, I see her on the trail

Binoculars around her neck

Head down as she passes

 

How sad for her

She has no time for me

I had a birding mentor

 

She became my friend

Her name was Ann

A kind and gentle soul

 

She taught me well

I treasure those days, with heartfelt appreciation

For they are no more, she is gone now

                                                   ~By Sheila 08/20/2013~

White-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch

This image was taken, in my yard, last year about this time. I saw a Nuthatch last evening, pecking its way down a Pine to its base to then grab a seed out of a feeder. So much fun to watch.

Happy Birding!