Tag Archives: Eastbank Campground

~Toast each sundown with wine

Read these words to understand,

Life can be enjoyed,

By the simplest of things.


This song was written by Toby Keith:

Don’t let the old man in

I wanna leave this alone

Can’t leave it up to him

He’s knocking on my door

And I knew all of my life

That someday it would end

Get up and go outside

Don’t let the old man in

Many moons I have lived

My body’s weathered and worn

Ask yourself how would you be

If you didn’t know the day you were born

Try to love on your wife

And stay close to your friends

Toast each sundown with wine

Don’t let the old man in

Many moons I have lived

My body’s weathered and worn

Ask yourself how would you be

If you didn’t know the day you were born

When he rides up on his horse

And you feel that cold bitter wind

Look out your window and smile

Don’t let the old man in

I like the version sung by Willie Nelson.

~A few more photos to rap up our Purvis and Eastbank visits

Scenes from Purvis, Mississippi…

Lace, pretty girl.
Lace, pretty girl. Front pond in the background.

IMG_4676
A Spring bird nest?

An old bird nest
Another Spring bird nest

Leland's favorite Live Oak Tree
Leland’s favorite Live Oak Tree

Scenes from Eastbank Campground…

A beautiful sunset and a little Pied-billed Grebe swimming around. I took these photos, on our first night at Eastbank Campground, about a week ago.

 

Next…

Photos from our visit to The Villages, Florida

~Today’s Feathered Friend – Eastern Bluebird~

 The Eastern Bluebird is a Thrush

Eloquent songsters of open marshes and woodlands, the thrushes include many familiar species. With narrow notched bills they feed on insects and fruit.

Eastern Blue Bird
Eastern Blue Bird (male)

Male in breeding plumage
Throat, sides of neck and breast are a chestnut color. Belly white. Males are deep blue above, females grayer.

Eastern Blue Bird in breeding plumage.
Nest in holes in trees and posts, and in nesting boxes.

Bluebird Conservation:

Eastern Bluebird populations increased by almost 2 percent per year between 1966 and 2010, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey. Partners in Flight estimates the global breeding population at 22 million, with 86 percent spending part of the year in the U.S., 22 percent in Mexico, and 1 percent breeding in Canada.

They rate a 7 out of 20 on the Continental Concern Score and they are not on the 2012 Watch List. Eastern Bluebird populations fell in the early twentieth century as aggressive introduced species such as European Starlings and House Sparrows made available nest holes increasingly difficult for bluebirds to hold on to.

In the 1960s and 1970s establishment of bluebird trails and other nest box campaigns alleviated much of this competition, especially after people began using nest boxes designed to keep out the larger European Starling. Eastern Bluebird numbers have been recovering since.

For more information on this beautiful thrush, please visit this web-site – http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Bluebird/id

 ~Sharing with Charlotte at Prairie Birder for Feathers on Friday 

https://prairiebirder.wordpress.com/2015/03/06/feathers-on-friday-139/

~Sharing with Michelle at Rambling Woods for Nature Notes

http://ramblingwoods.com/2015/03/02/nature-notes-302how-do-bumblebees-hibernate/

~Sharing with Eileen at Viewing nature with Eileen

http://viewingnaturewitheileen.blogspot.com/2015/03/saturdays-critters-64.html